Elizabeth Gilbert’s keys to a big, creative life

A very interesting interview with Elizabeth Gilbert turned up in my Facebook stream. Elizabeth Gilbert’s keys to a big, creative life is 50 minutes well spent. I love to hear her talk about creativity and fear.

From that interview is a link to another interview, just as interesting! This interview is from February 2015: Elizabeth Gilbert is guided in her life and writing by curiosity

More with Elizabeth Gilbert

Her TED-talk: A different way to think about creative genius
A book review: Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert

Reflections February 9, 2016

Today is one of those days when I think too much.

I have three mantra words. They are openness (open-minded, inquisitive, non-judging), presence (be here and now) and gratitude. To me that’s a great mindset. Sometimes they are hard to follow, there are days like today when I do expect much more of myself – making a bigger difference in the world.

Days like these pass, in a larger context they are simply minor bumps in the road. The last days I have watched some videos and listened to some podcasts. What I took from them was this that can be handy to get back to where I want to be.

  • Stay inquisitive! Curiosity might have killed the cat but it drives both learning and change.
  • Be present and grateful!
  • See and create magic!
  • Dare to be messy! (days like today and failing)
  • Be the best you can be!

What are your tricks to get back to your place of strength?

Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert

I just finished Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear by Elizabeth Gilbert and I love it. The book is about creative living, regardless of what you’re creating. Whether you’re a writer, painter, photographer, do pottery or anything else this book is inspiring. The book description at The Book Depository says:

Readers of all ages and walks of life have drawn inspiration from Elizabeth Gilbert’s books for years. Now, this beloved author shares her wisdom and unique understanding of creativity, shattering the perceptions of mystery and suffering that surround the process – and showing us all just how easy it can be. By sharing stories from her own life, as well as those from her friends and the people that have inspired her, Elizabeth Gilbert challenges us to embrace our curiosity, tackle what we most love and face down what we most fear. Whether you long to write a book, create art, cope with challenges at work, embark on a long-held dream, or simply to make your everyday life more vivid and rewarding, Big Magic will take you on a journey of exploration filled with wonder and unexpected joys.

I love the book, how it’s written as well as Gilbert’s view on how creativity and ideas work. Much of the context is familiar but Gilbert uses storytelling (from her own life as well as others) to emphasize things and make her point. The five main parts in the book – courage, enchantment, permission, persistence and trust – cover all that’s essential.

The key things I got from the book was to rely on my curiosity, to write for myself, to get started (and keep going) because no one else will do my work.

Some quotes from the book

I’m the kind of person that underline text that is important to me. Your mileage might vary, here are some of what I marked.

Creative living: I’m talking about living a life that is driven more strongly by curiosity than by fear.

The essential ingredients for creativity remain exactly the same for everybody: courage, enchantment, permission, persistence and trust.

Argue for your limitations and you get to keep them. (I needed that one…)

Bravery means doing something scary. Fearlessness means not even understanding what the word scary means

You are not required to save the world with your creativity. I would prefer that you made your art in order to save yourself rather than to save or relieve us. (I needed this one too…)

Perfectionism stops people from completing their work but even worse, it often stops people from beginning their work.

Curiosity vs passion

Gilbert writes about curiosity versus passion. Instead of chasing a passion (which might be hard to find), follow your curiosity. I love that, curiosity is a powerful tool.

Curiosity only ever asks one simple question: is there anything you’re interested in?

Instead of asking what you would do if you couldn’t fail Gilbert raises a far more interesing question:

What do you love doing so much that the words failure and success essentially become irrelevant?

Sit down and write!

Gilbert wrote “Done is better than good” and Seth Godin often talks about shipping (get things ready and deliver them). Even Buddha seems to share the same view.

An idea that is developed and put into action is more important than an idea that exists only as an idea.
Buddha

Is the book for you?

I suggest you take a look at Elizabeth Gilbert’s TED presentation about creativity, A different way to think about creative genius. If you like the content of that presentation then the book is for you.

Rituals and Routines when writing

WriteOver at The Huffington Post is a post about the benefits of routines and rituals in order to get your writing done. Each of us create the rituals that suits us, routines are more generic and worth learning from others. The post list the following five routines and rituals:

1. Write Before I Do Anything Else (Routine)
2. Write 5 Days A Week, Minimum (Routine)
3. Release Fears, Doubts and Excuses On the Regular (Ritual)
4. Acting “As If” (Ritual)
5. Amping Up My Mindset (Ritual)

When we write during the day is personal, the benefit of doing it first thing in the morning is that it gets done before other cores take over. She writes “Put your writing first. It’s the only way.” but I disagree. There’s no only way, figure out what works for you. I like my current morning routine which means I need to fit my writing in somewhere else during the day.

Creating a consistent writing routine (and sticking to it) is gold. She writes “Figure out a writing routine you can stick with consistently every week and then commit to showing up.”

What I love under mindset is this: “I’m a writer. I came here to show up, shine and make a difference with my words.”

Read the full article at 5 Rituals and Routines That Changed My Writing Life.

Bad writing precedes good writing

I posted about That elusive book of mine about a month ago. We have lots of ideas for topics but I haven’t done much actual writing. I got stuck with the idea that if I couldn’t write well then I shouldn’t write at all. Then this quote turned up and reminded we that practice makes perfect (or at least helps us get better at waht we’re doing). In other words, start writing and things will happen.

Bad writing precedes good writing. This is an infallible rule, so don’t waste time trying to avoid bad writing. (That just slows down the process.) Anything committed to paper can be changed. The idea is to start, and then go from there. – Janet Hulstrand

Bad writing precedes good writing

Simple questions for writers

Seth Godin has a great post with “simple” questions for writers. The questions are these:

  1. What is it for? (What’s your intention?)
  2. Who are you? (What’s your role?)
  3. Who is it for?
  4. Will it spread?

For the full post, go to Simple questions for writers.

I love the ending text: Writing can make a difference. Write to make a difference.

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