Tag: Change

I walk my talk

Coaching often is about goals and making dreams come through. I got my coach training in the fall of 2007. During 2008 I have shared my time between Logica and my own coaching business. My heart is in coaching, I have found my passion, yet I stayed at Logica.

When Logica in December decided to downsize a window of opportunity opened for me. I got an offer to leave on short notice, we signed the deal today. This means I leave Logica at the end of December and from 2009 it is my coaching business that gets my undivided attention.

This will be an interesting ride, I intend to make 2009 my best year yet, wish me luck.

This was originally posted at Forty Plus Two, another blog of mine.

Lightworker

When I woke up today I had two words spinning in my head. The first one, ochoa, is Basque and means wolf. That does not ring any bell so I guess it was not important after all. The other word was lightworker which I had to look up. At Wikipedia it said:

Lightworkers are people who feel inspired to help others through “Shining Their Light”, teaching, spiritual meditation, healing, prayer, writing and speaking with Universal Love.

This makes more sense and I searched for more information. At Steve Pavlina I found a very interesting post about something he calls the Lightworker Syndrome.

This is what happens when someone wakes up to a higher level of consciousness, but they can’t figure out how to live on purpose and feed themselves at the same time.

Steve Pavlina ends his post with a quote by Marianne Williamson. The quote starts like this:

Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us.

I have found my passion but there is also my spiritual interest. Now I need to figure out how to make a living from my passion and spiritual interest.

This was originally posted at another (now extinct) blog of mine.

Institutions vs. collaboration

Over at TED is a talk from 2005 by Clay Shirky about Institutions vs. collaboration. It is a very interesting talk about how closed groups and companies will give way to looser networks. Clay talks about institutions compared to collaboration, like Microsoft versus Linux. He shows the graphs behind the 80-20 rule, few contribute a lot and many contribute very little. Still, the small contributions can be very valuable.

Clay mentions Flickr and their tagging feature that makes it easy to find photos on a topic regardless of who uploaded that photo.

Clay also talks about Meetup, with the tag line Meetup Groups meet face-to-face to pursue hobbies, network, get support, make friends, find playgroups, and how that system is used as a tool for stay at home moms to create a real life social network.

This was originally posted at Forty Plus Two, another blog of mine.

To learn and grow

Browsing around among blogs I came across “Transforming Stress Into Personal Power” and read about Jean and her basic philosophy.

Stay curious and open to life. No matter what happens keep learning and growing. Find what you love to do and find a way to share it with others.

This is a lot like my own philosophy, be open to life and follow your inquisitive mind. I enjoying learning and sharing, that is the main reason why I blog.

This was originally posted at another (now extinct) blog of mine.

Do Less, Achieve More

I have finished Do Less, Achieve More by Chin-Ning Chu. The subtitle is Discover the hidden power of giving in. The book is divided into three parts, each one dealing with one of the three secrets which are:

  1. Fine-tune your actions
  2. Put your mind at ease
  3. Discover the divine power

Under finetuning your actions is a list of 18 tips. There is also this gem about time management, it is worth repeating that:

Time management is about managing ourselves, not about managing time.

A part in this section is called ‘Life is full’, looking back we have always filled our 24 hours. But did we do what we really wanted to do?

Success is not about having more. It is about fine-tuning your understanding of what you are willing to give up in order to get what you really want.

The conclusion for fine-tuning: Trade what does not work for what you really want.

The second section, put your mind at ease, is about accepting divine guidance. Life is a school, unless you complete your lessons at each phase you do not get to move forward.

In the third section, discover the divine power, it states that as long as we are reacting we have lost sight of our own agenda. The author wants us to find our point of restfulness which makes it possible to stay in control. She mentions mediatation and intuition as tools for this, the books describes six techniques.

I have mixed feelings about the book since to me it revealed no secrets but I guess that depends on where we are in our own progress.

This was originally posted at another (now extinct) blog of mine.

Leave the door open

At Pick The Brain is a post about The Other Side of Productivity: Coincidences, Synchronicity, and Serendipity. The post lists “Three Methods for Attracting Coincidences and Serendipity”.

Believing in the phenomenon of coincidences and serendipity does not mean that you shun work and sit cross-legged waiting for the universe to deliver your dreams to your doorstep. It simply means that you plan your days utilizing the best organization and scheduling tools, tips, and advice you can find, while leaving the door open to startling, dramatic occurrences.

It is a great post and I love the final sentence: Plan your day, but expect for things even better than those that you have planned to happen.

This was originally posted at another (now extinct) blog of mine.

The Manifestation Wheel

I have finished a really interesting book titled The Manifestation Wheel: A Practical Process for Creating Miracles written by Alan Seale. The Manifestation Wheel is an interesting concept created by Alan Seale and partly based on the Lakota medicine wheel.

The Manifestation Wheel is made up of eight “houses” or steps: intention, peace, energy, guidance, empowerment, action, surrender, and legacy. Through these eight houses, the Manifestation Wheel offers a process that helps readers create the conditions necessary for their vision to manifest. It calls forth the reader’s intuition and develops deeper and higher levels of awareness.

Alan explains that in beginning a project, we usually begin by clarifying what we want. However the immediate next question, one that is rarely asked, must be, “What is the greatest potential wanting to unfold?” This is the true catalyzing question. The Wheel takes you beyond personal wants and desires to tap into a bigger picture—a picture of “what wants to happen,” a picture of your greatest potential and the greatest potential of a moment, situation, project, or vision.

The book guides the reader through the eight houses of the wheel. Exercises and questions for each house help you keep your project on the move and aligned to the structure of the wheel. The eight houses form a logical path from vision to legacy, placing action plans in the sixth house and using the first five houses to build a solid foundation. The final step in each house is to go back through the previous ones and see if anything has to be changed.

In the eight house of legacy you shall consider sustainability and long term implications of your project. What is the impact on coming generations? That is something we rarely ask ourselves.

For many years, Alan used the Lakota Medicine Wheel and its concepts to powerful effect in the building of his life, career, and relationships. Recognizing that the language of the Medicine Wheel was a bit arcane for today’s world, he adapted the Medicine Wheel to create the Manifestation Wheel, a tool that is accessible, practical, and immediately productive for individuals, businesses, and organizations in the 21st century. Now Alan has written the guidebook to the Manifestation Wheel, making this simple yet profound process available to everyone.

I love the book, it is well written and the Manifestation Wheel is a very useful tool. But available to everyone is a stretch, you must have an open mind and trust the combination of spiritual wisdom and scientific knowledge.

The image is borrowed from Allan Seale’s site.

This was originally posted at another (now extinct) blog of mine.

Three books by Robin Sharma

I have read and reviewed three books by Robin Sharma. Here is a short summary and links to my reviews.

The monk who sold his Ferrari is a great book that covers much of Eastern and Western wisdom around life and success. The book is well written and the concepts are nicely fitted into a frame, a fable around the seven virtues. This book is the first one with the monk and where you get to know his history plus why and how he changed.

Discover Your Destiny With The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari is labeled “A potent pathway to self-awakening that will help you to live your greatest life and claim the happiness, prosperity and inner peace that you deserve”. Still, this is not one of those “just wish and it will be yours”-books, instead it is a guide book on how to discover your authentic self and achieve lasting inner peace.

The Saint The Surfer And The CEO is about a person’s three final questions: Did I live wisely? Did I love well? Did I serve greatly? I like this book too, it gave me valuable input to help change my life and views.

This was originally posted at another (now extinct) blog of mine.

How do you change your thinking?

I got this quote a while back:

The greatest discovery of my lifetime was that a person can change the circumstances of his life by changing his thoughts.
William James

Change is an important issue, both on a personal level and for society and our world. It brings another quote to my mind: “Change comes from within.”

Another quote, by Albert Einstein:

Clearly the problems we suffer cannot be solved at the same level of thinking with which we created them.

Albert said it well, to solve our problems (personal or at other levels) we have to think in a new way. The trick is to change how we think, being open minded helps a lot.

How do YOU change your thinking?

This was originally posted at another (now extinct) blog of mine.

Discover Your Destiny

Discover Your Destiny With The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari is labeled “A potent pathway to self-awakening that will help you to live your greatest life and claim the happiness, prosperity and inner peace that you deserve”. The book is written by Robin Sharma, author of The monk who sold his Ferrari.

The Monk is back in a new book on awakening your authentic greatness, full of fresh and exciting new lessons to stimulate your life. Combining Eastern wisdom with Western success principles in this inspiring, yet highly practical guide, Robin Sharma offers a blueprint for living a beautiful life, rich with joy, prosperity and lasting inner peace.

Discover Your Destiny With The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari offers more of the life-changing wisdom of Julian Mantle, the monk who sold his Ferrari. The book follows the story of Dar Sanderson, a highly ambitious executive who, despite his apparent success, is deeply unhappy. A serendipitous encounter with Julian Mantle sets Dar on an adventure to discover his authentic self and reclaim the life of his dreams.

You will learn the true purpose of your life, how to unlock your highest potential, the secret of boundless joy and a direct route to personal freedom. This is a powerful blend of deep wisdom and practical life lessons that will open you up to the possibilities that your life was meant to be and transform all dimensions of your world forever.

I like this book a lot. It is not one of those “just wish and it will be yours”-books, instead it is a guide book on how to discover your authentic self and achieve lasting inner peace.

I have read the book in Swedish.